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How to Photograph Christmas and Fairy Lights Like a Pro

How to Photograph Christmas and Fairy Lights Like a Pro

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It’s the holiday season, which means big meals, a flood of Christmas and holiday cards, family moments, decorations, gifts, and a slew of photos. We’ve come to give you the gift of knowledge that keeps on giving. So please grab a cup of cocoa and read on for our Christmas light background photography tips for indoor and outdoor scenes.

The majority of Christmas light photos are nearly identical. The buildings and trees have their little lights against a pitch-black background (probably too far away). It makes sense to wait until nightfall because you don’t want the sun to consume all of the light, and lights, after all, look best in the dark.

Exposure becomes problematic when it’s pitch black outside. Your camera can expose the lights or the lights’ surroundings properly. They’ll appear to be floating in space if the camera reveals the lights. The lights will be thoroughly washed out, almost colourless if exposed to the environment.

How to Remove the Background on Images for your Christmas 

If you want to make completely transparent images, ClickMajic is the right tool to use.

Tips to help you get the most out of your Christmas photos

  • Add your Product to the list (drag and drop)
  • Allow AI to do the heavy lifting for you when removing the backdrop from your Product.
  • Your high-resolution photograph should be saved to your computer.
  • Great! In less than 5 seconds, you’ve removed your Product’s background.

In addition, we offer a bulk logo background remover and product image background API.

1. Photograph around twilight or dusk

The ambient light will perfectly complement the continuous artificial lighting for a few minutes. You’ll be able to see the beautiful ambient colours of the sky and surroundings, as well as a lot more photographic texture, as opposed to the flat blackness. Rather than exposing for the sky, expose for the lights. As a result, the sky’s ambient light will complement the lights, allowing you to maintain your focus.

2. Act fast

If you’ve ever attempted to photograph a sunset, you know how quickly the light changes. Each minute between sunset and nightfall brings slightly different lighting conditions. The ambient light will perfectly complement the continuous artificial lighting for a few minutes.

3. Go for an incandescent white balance

It’s called Tungsten by your camera, but it’s the same thing. Because the lights you’re photographing are most likely incandescent bulbs, the Incandescent setting will accurately render their colour.

How to Change the Exposure Compensation

1. Switch to a different shooting mode.

Select one of the three modes: P, Av, or Tv.

2. Choose the exposure compensation you want. Turn the electronic dial while pressing the exposure compensation button. Turning the dial to the right causes positive balance, while turning it to the left causes negative compensation.

3. Verify the value of exposure compensation.

From the rear LCD screen, check the exposure compensation value that has been set. If the effect isn’t what you want, change the value.

Increase the exposure time if you need more light (slow shutter speed)

Instead of increasing the ISO, try this. This avoids the grain that a higher ISO would introduce, and the long exposure captures the full glory of the light show. It’s worth noting, however, that it exposes your photo to blurry moving subjects (kids, flying reindeer, trees in the wind).

How to Put Lights Vertically on a Christmas Tree

Hanging Christmas tree lights vertically is a trend that has been circulating for a few years. Because the lights are less likely to be obscured by branches and more visible, this method ensures that the tree shines brightly. Plus, once the holidays are over, it’s a lot easier to take them down!

  • Start at the top or bottom of the tree with the plugless end of your lights and lay the lights vertically like a seam.
  • Turn the lights back the other way each time you reach the top or bottom of the tree until you have a sideways “S” pattern around the entire tree.
  • Hang gleaming ornaments in the centre to help reflect light and add depth.

Take Dreamy Self-Portraits at Home

In fairy light photography, a variety of elements can be used. Using another light source to make your face more visible if your fairy lights aren’t bright enough. I used a sparkler to give my face a warm glow during this shoot. Creating a contrast between my face and the background’s cooler tones.

Practice in front of the mirror before photographing other people or objects with fairy lights. Use your imagination to light your face and create your backdrop. These exercises will help you become a better self-portrait photographer. They’ll teach you how to photograph with fairy lights—giving you a confidence boost before your photoshoot.

How do you take good pictures with fairy lights?

If you don’t have one, a steady surface will suffice. Consider resting your camera on a table or the arm of a chair. In low-light situations, using a tripod and a slow shutter speed will help you get sharper shots. Capturing the sparkle and shine of the fairy lights.

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